Participant Info

First Name
Lindsay
Last Name
Benstead
Country
University
Portland State University
Keywords
Middle East and North Africa, Identity politics (religion, tribe, gender), women and politics, legislatures, public opinion, authoritarian regimes, democratization, clientelism, service provision, local governance.
Availability
Media Contact

Personal Info

About Me

Lindsay J. Benstead is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Portland State University and Contributing Scholar in the Women’s Rights in the Middle East Program at Rice University. She has conducted surveys in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Jordan and contributes to the Transitional Governance Project and the Program on Governance and Local Development at Yale University and University of Gothenburg. Her research has appeared in Perspectives on Politics, Governance, and Foreign Affairs. She holds a Ph.D. in Public Policy and Political Science from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and served as a fellow at Yale University and Princeton University.

Recent Publications

Lindsay J. Benstead. 2016. “Why Quotas Are Needed to Improve Women’s Access to Services in Clientelistic Regimes.” Governance 29(2): 185-205. doi:10.1111/gove.12162. First published online 2015. doi: 10.1080/21565503.2015.1084338.

Lindsay J. Benstead. 2014. “Why Do Some Arab Citizens See Democracy as Unsuitable for Their Country?” Democratization. First published online September 3, 2014. doi: 10.1080/13510347.2014.940041.

Lindsay J. Benstead. 2014. “Does Interviewer Religious Dress Affect Survey Responses? Evidence from Morocco.” Politics and Religion 7(4): 734-760. doi: 10.1017/S1755048314000455.

Lindsay J. Benstead. 2014. “Effects of Interviewer-Respondent Gender Interaction on Attitudes toward Women and Politics: Findings from Morocco.” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 26(3): 369-383. First published online September 27, 2013. doi: 10.1093/ijpor/edt024.

 

Lindsay J. Benstead and Megan Reif. Forthcoming. “Coke, Pepsi or Mecca Cola? Why Product Characteristics Shape Collective Action Problems and Boycott Success.” Politics, Groups, and Identities.

Lindsay J. Benstead, Amaney A. Jamal, and Ellen Lust. 2015. “Is it Gender, Religion or Both? A Role Congruity Theory of Candidate Electability in Transitional Tunisia.” Perspectives on Politics 13(1): 74-94.

Lindsay J. Benstead and Megan Reif. 2013. “Polarization or Pluralism: Language, Identity, and Attitudes toward Western Culture among Algeria’s Youth.” Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication 6: 75-106.

Lindsay J. Benstead. “Tunisia.” Forthcoming. Chapter 17 in The Government and Politics of the Middle East and North Africa, 8th Ed. Edited by Mark Gasiorowski and Sean Yom. Westview Press.

Lindsay J. Benstead. Forthcoming. “Explaining Egalitarian Attitudes: The Role of Interests and Exposure.” Chapter 6 in Empowering Women after the Arab Spring. Edited by Marwa Shalaby and Valentine Moghadam. Palgrave MacMillan.

Lindsay J. Benstead. Forthcoming. “Survey Research in the Arab World.” In Oxford University Press Handbook on Polling and Polling Methods. Edited by Lonna Atkeson and R. Michael Alvarez. Oxford University Press.

Lindsay J. Benstead, Ellen Lust, and Jakob Wichmann. “It’s Morning in Libya: Why Democracy Marches On.” Foreign Affairs. August 6, 2013.

Lindsay J. Benstead, Ellen Lust, Dhafer Malouche, Gamal Soltan, and Jakob Wichmann. “Islamists Aren’t the Obstacle: How to Build Democracy in Egypt and Tunisia.” Foreign Affairs. February 14, 2013.

 

Media Coverage

 

Lindsay J. Benstead. “Why Quotas are Needed to Achieve Gender Equality.” The Washington Post, Monkey Cage, November 10, 2015. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2015/11/10/why-quotas-are-needed-to-achieve-gender-equality/

 

Lindsay J. Benstead. “Why Some Arabs Don’t Want Democracy.” The Washington Post, Monkey Cage, September 30, 2014. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/monkey-cage/wp/2014/09/30/why-some-arabs-dont-want-democracy/

 

Lindsay J. Benstead and Ellen Lust. September 24, 2015. “Women’s Political Participation in North Africa: Lessons from Recent Research.” Civil Society and Political Transitions in the MENA and Southeast Asia. Middle East-Asia Project (MAP). Middle East Institute. http://www.mei.edu/content/map/gender-gap-political-participation-north-africa

 

Lindsay J. Benstead, Amaney A. Jamal, and Ellen Lust. “Why Tunisians (Don’t) Vote for Women.” The Washington Post, Monkey Cage, May 4, 2015.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/monkey-cage/wp/2015/05/04/why-tunisians-dont-vote-for-women/

 

Lindsay J. Benstead, Ellen Lust, Dhafer Malouche, and Jakob Wichmann. “Tunisian Elections Bring Hope in Uncertain Times.” The Washington Post, Monkey Cage, October 27, 2014. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/monkey-cage/wp/2014/10/27/tunisian-elections-bring-hope-in-uncertain-times/

 

Lindsay J. Benstead, Alexander Kjærum, Ellen Lust, and Jakob Wichmann. “Libya’s Security Dilemma.” The Washington Post, Monkey Cage, April 7, 2014. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/monkey-cage/wp/2014/04/07/libyas-security-dilemma/

 

Lindsay J. Benstead, Ellen Lust, Dhafer Malouche, Gamal Soltan, and Jakob Wichmann. “Winners and Losers after the Arab Spring.” Yale Global Online, August 27, 2013. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/winners-and-losers-after-arab-spring

 

Lindsay J. Benstead, Ellen Lust, and Dhafer Malouche. “Tunisians Frustrated but Engaged.” Foreign Policy, December 11, 2012. http://mideast.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2012/12/11/tunisians_frustrated_but_engaged

 

Lindsay J. Benstead, Ellen Lust, and Dhafer Malouche. “Tunisian Revolution is Work in Progress.” Yale Global Online, December 19, 2012.

http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/tunisian-revolution-work-progress

Country Focus
Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Jordan

Research Areas

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