Julie Novkov, Ph.D.

jnovkov@albany.edu

University at Albany, SUNY

Phone: 518-442-5276

Address: University at Albany, SUNY, 135 Western Avenue

City: Albany, New York - 12222

Country: United States

About Me:

Novkov is a Collins Fellow, Professor of Political Science and Director of Undergraduate Advising, and Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, at the University at Albany, SUNY. Her research and teaching address law, history, US political development, and subordinated identity. She is the author of Racial Union, which was the co-recipient of the American Political Science Association's 2009 Ralph Bunche Award, Constituting Workers, Protecting Women (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press 2001), The Supreme Court and The Presidency (CQ Press, 2013), and the co-editor of Statebuilding from the Margins (with Carol Nackenoff, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014),  Race and American Political Development (with Joseph Lowndes and Dorian Warren, Routledge Press, 2008), and Security Disarmed (with Barbara Sutton and Sandra Morgen, Rutgers University Press, 2008) as well as many other articles and book chapters. She served as chair of Political Science from 2011-2017 and President of the Western Political Science Association from 2016-2017, and is currently Chair of APSA’s Law and Courts section.

Research Interests

Judicial Politics

Class, Inequality, and Labor Politics

Gender and Politics

Race, Ethnicity and Politics

LGBTQIA Politics

Specific Areas of Interest

US Constitutional Law

Gender And Politics

Race And Politics

Political History

Sexuality And Politics

American Political Development

Countries of Interest

United States

My Research:

Novkov is currently working on three projects. The first is a co-edited volume with Carol Nackenoff on the role and function of family in American political development. The second, also with Carol Nackenoff, is a Landmark Cases book on Wong Kim Ark v. United States. The third is a book on the connection between military service and claims for rights and civic membership by men of color in the Civil War, the Spanish American and Philippine American Wars, and World War I.