Natalie Dyvesether, Ph.D. Candidate

nmdyvesether@gmail.com

University of Oslo

City: Oslo

Country: Norway

About Me:

Natalie is currently pursuing a master's degree in Political Science at the University of Oslo. She has earned a BSc Political Science and a BSc Economics from NTNU, where she was employed as a Teaching Assistant at the Department of Sociology and Political Science. She has been working as a Research Assistant at the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) since January 2017. LinkedIn profile: https://no.linkedin.com/in/natalie-m-dyvesether-76484369/en
A revised version of her bachelor's thesis in Political Science titled "Are Politics or Markets the Key to Gender Equality in the Labor Market? The Effects of Political Rights and Market Liberalization on Women’s Economic Rights, 1981-2011" is published in the Norwegian Political Science Association’s journal Norsk statsvitenskapelig tidsskrift. 

Research Interests

Gender and Politics

Development

Political Economy

Peacekeeping

Human Rights

Research Methods & Research Design

Specific Areas of Interest

Women's Rights

Women And Security

Womenomics

Gender

Gender Gap

Countries of Interest

Bangladesh

India

My Research:

Research Interests: ​Gender Equality; Development; Gender, Peace and Security; Political Economy; Peacekeeping.

Publications:

Journal Articles:

(2017) Are Politics or Markets the Key to Gender Equality in the Labor Market? The Effects of Political Rights and Market Liberalization on Women’s Economic Rights, 1981–2011, Norsk statsvitenskapelig tidsskrift

Tags: Gender and Politics, Human Rights, Political Economy

Whether politics or markets are the key to gender equality in the labor market is a source of contention. Neoliberals champion «laissez-faire», whereas historical materialist and feminist economic theorists highlight government measures for the enhancement of women’s economic empowerment. This study empirically investigates the effects of women’s political rights and market liberalization on women’s economic rights. Using panel data for 115 countries over the 1981-2011 period, I find that women’s political rights positively affect women’s economic rights. When controlling for country heterogeneity, however, market liberalization predicts lower levels of women’s economic rights. These findings suggest that market liberalization has a deteriorating effect on economic gender equality and support the call for government action.