Nisha Nath, Ph.D.

nnath@ualberta.ca

Athabasca University

Country: Canada (Alberta)

About Me:

Dr. Nisha Nath is an Assistant Professor of Equity Studies at Athabasca University.  She's taught extensively in the Department of Political Science at the University of Alberta, in the fields of Canadian Politics, Gender and Politics, and Contemporary Political Theory. Dr. Nath’s work examines the interplay of belonging, representation and nationalism; how immigration and multiculturalism are situated within the politics of race in a settler-colonial state; and the ways in which political dissidence is securitized and surveilled. Her SSHRC-funded project, Far from belonging: Race, Security, Dissent and the Canadian Citizenship Story after 9/11, argues that the politics of exclusion are not unique to the post-9/11 context, but are deeply connected to practices of liberal citizenship. A contributing editor to the Dissent, Democracy and the Law Research Network between 2013-2017, Dr. Nath’s work on race, identity, multiculturalism, and citizenship has appeared in the Canadian Journal of Political Science, Canadian Ethnic Studies, and most recently in the edited collection, “Unsettling Colonial Modernity: Islamicate Contexts in Focus.”

Research Interests

Canadian Politics

Gender and Politics

Race, Ethnicity and Politics

Immigration & Citizenship

Countries of Interest

Canada

My Research:

I am a critical citizenship scholar that focuses specifically on the Canadian context.  I look at the interplay of belonging, representation and nationalism; how immigration and multiuclturalism are situated within the politics of race in a settler-colonial state; and, the ways in which political dissidence is securitized and surveilled.  My current research project, The Missing Dissident Citizen at The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) examines the limits and possibilities of the CMHR’s human rights frame for countering oppression.  Animated by the growing importance of national public history institutions, my research responds to a gap in the literature where alternatives to the human rights framework have been underexplored.  In this methodologically interdisciplinary project, I address the status and importance of dissidence to Canadian citizenship by bringing together securitization theory, critiques of the narrowing effect of human rights frameworks with recent critiques of recognition and inclusion by anti-racist, decolonial and Indigenous scholars.