Rosalyn Cooperman, Ph.D.

rcooperm@umw.edu

Mary Washington College

Country: United States (Virginia)

Research Interests

Gender and Politics

Political Parties and Interest Groups

Campaign Finance

Specific Areas of Interest

Women's PACs

Countries of Interest

United States

Publications:

Journal Articles:

(2018) Can’t Buy Them Love: How Party Culture among Donors Contributes to the Party Gap in Women’s Representation, Journal of Politics

Tags: Political Parties and Interest Groups, Gender and Politics

Melody Crowder-Meyer and Rosalyn Cooperman Why do Democratic women seek and hold office more frequently than Republican women? We use an original survey of donors to party campaign committees and women’s political action committees to answer this question. We theorize that the intense policy demanders in each party have built party cultures with substantively different orientations toward women’s political involvement. These cultures shape party elites’ behavior and influence responsiveness to a newly defined policy-demander group—women’s representation policy demanders (WRPDs)—whose primary goal is to increase women’s political representation. We reveal that Democratic elites’ political activity and financial contributions are significantly more motivated by WRPD concerns than are Republicans. We also show that WRPDs like EMILY’s List and Susan B. Anthony List are far more integrated into Democratic than Republican party coalitions. Thus, we reveal both the continued existence of distinct party cultures and the consequences of this distinction for women’s representation.

Book Chapters:

(2018) The Right Women: Republican Party Activists, Candidates, and Legislators, Praeger Press

Tags: Political Parties and Interest Groups, Campaign Finance, Gender and Politics

Rosalyn Cooperman and Melody Crowder-Meyer A Run for Their Money: Republican Women's Hard Road to Campaign Funding This chapter examines why the campaign finance networks of Republican women candidates are underdeveloped when compared to those of their Democratic counterparts and the significance of this disparity in the party gap in representation for Republican and Democratic women candidates and officeholders more broadly.