Samantha Mosier, Ph.D.

mosiers18@ecu.edu

East Carolina University

Country: United States (North Carolina)

About Me:

Samantha L. Mosier is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at East Carolina University, where she teaches courses on public policy, public administration, environmental policy, leadership, and ethics. Samantha earned her PhD in Political Science at Colorado State University and a MPA from Auburn University at Montgomery.
Samantha is the author of Creating Organic Standards in U.S. States:The Diffusion of State Organic Food and Agriculture Legislation and co-author of Performance Measurement in Sustainability Programs: Lessons from American Cities. Her research has also appeared in Food Policy, Environment and Planning C, Environmental Management, and International Journal of Public Administration. Her current research focuses on partisanship and dietary behavior, sustainable agriculture marketing and policy, and service engagement by faculty in public affairs and public administration programs.

Research Interests

Public Policy

Environmental Policy

Public Administration

Sustainability

Food And Agriculture

University-Community Partnerships

Engaged Scholarship

Organic Food Label

GMO Food Label

My Research:

Samantha L. Mosier is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at East Carolina University (ECU), where she teaches courses on public policy, public administration, leadership, and environmental policy. Samantha earned her PhD in Political Science at Colorado State University and a MPA from Auburn University at Montgomery.
Samantha is the author of Creating Organic Standards in U.S. States:The Diffusion of State Organic Food and Agriculture Legislation and co-author of Performance Measurement in Sustainability Programs: Lessons from American Cities. Her research has also appeared in Food Policy, Environment and Planning CEnvironmental Management, and International Journal of Public Administration. Her current research focuses on university-community partnerships for environmental sustainability, service engagement by MPA faculty members, and food labeling and marketing policy. 

Publications:

Journal Articles:

(2018) Sustainability Town-Gown Partnerships: Lessons for Practitioners and Scholars from Highly Sustainable Communities, Environment and Planning

As local communities face increasing pressure to address environmental concerns, town–gown partnerships are one avenue for improving environmental conditions and sustainability planning for the future. Partnerships between community leaders and university students, faculty, and staff can provide an avenue for exchanging knowledge, expertise, and resources that may benefit both parties. Based on survey results from highly sustainable U.S. cities, this paper outlines key lessons for practitioners and scholars interested in developing environmentally focused town–gown partnerships.

(2018) Performance Measurement in Sustainability Programs: Lessons from American Cities, Routledge ASPA Series

Forthcoming book on performance measurement activities by U.S. Cities.

(2017) Creating Organic Standards in U.S. States: The Diffusion of State Organic Food and Agriculture Legislation, Lexington Books

The organic food and agriculture market has greatly expanded over the course of the past forty years. Once considered a fringe practice and market, organic food and agriculture now receives mainstream acceptance and political support in the United States. The USDA’s National Organic Program regulates the current U.S. market, but organic regulations were originally developed in the states starting in the 1970s. From 1976-2010, thirty-eight states adopted organic food and agriculture regulatory legislation. A majority of state legislatures adopted initial legislation in 1989 and 1990, the same year as Congress passed the Organic Foods Production Act that effective began the development of national level standards. Grounded in the policy diffusion and diffusion of innovation literature, Creating Organic examines why and how state legislatures decide to adopt legislation that regulate the organic food and agriculture market. The consequences for early and continual state involvement in this policy domain impact national policy trajectories and reshape the sustainable agriculture market. The evidence from this evaluation demonstrates a host of conditions led to the diffusion and evolution of organic regulatory legislation in the U.S. California, Vermont, and Georgia are case studies that illuminate the complexities of adoption decisions and evolution of state regulations over time. In turn, there are a number of lessons to be derived for how state regulatory design has influenced today’s organic market and federal policy development

(2016) Diffusion of Food Policy in the U.S.: The Case of Organic Certification, Food Policy

Organic food certification policy and programs are an interesting case to explore in terms of policy diffusion, as there has been interesting dynamics between the federal and state levels, and great diversity in the pace of diffusion across states. At the same time, this policy diffusion underlies a very dynamic marketplace that has relied on government-based certification policies and programs to stabilize and support growth of the organic food sector. The focus of this paper is a cross-section time series analysis of organic policy adoptions over the past several decades to explore the types of factors that have influenced diffusion across time and space. Although federal policy activity has been a key driver of this dynamic, there are several other state-specific factors that also help to explain the differential diffusion of policies in this realm.

(2015) Does the Gown Help the Town? Examining Town-Gown Relationship Influence on Local Environmental Sustainability, International Journal of Public Administration

A US municipality environmental sustainability index, the OSSPI (Opp-Saunders Sustainability Practices Index), found an overwhelming percentage of top-ranked sustainable cities were home to higher education institutions. While this may be a coincidence, this research seeks to determine if and how local communities partner or collaborate with higher education institutions for environmental sustainability purposes. The results of two case studies, San Antonio, Texas and Dubuque, Iowa, suggest there is considerable variability in the town-gown relationships. However, it is found that larger, public universities are more likely to have stronger relationships and effects on local sustainability efforts.

(2013) Can Local Voluntary Environmental Programs ‘Work’?: An Examination of the City of Fort Collins' (Colorado) Climate Wise Program., Environmental Management

Previous research on voluntary environmental programs (VEPs) frequently assesses the effectiveness of federal, state, and third party programs and why organizations seek to join such programs. Yet, research has yet to evaluate the effectiveness or firm motivation relative to local VEPs. Recognizing this gap, our paper examines the structure and organization of Fort Collins’ Climate Wise program, a local VEP. Using a variety of sources, we find that the program has successfully met both short- and longterm goals by persistently self-evaluating and seeking outside financial support. Findings from this analysis can aid in understanding and developing local VEPs elsewhere. Specifically, this initial research suggests that local VEPs need to consider local context and available resources when implementing such programs. Furthermore, it is possible for local VEPs to attract a diverse variety of participating firms by avoiding one-size-fits-all participation levels and by establishing a sense of ownership among partners.

(2013) Cummins Filtration and the City of Cookeville (TN) Unplugged Challenge: A P3 for Energy Efficiency, Local Economic Development and the Environment

This book chapter covers the partnership between the City of Cookeville (TN) and Cummins Filtration that led to the development of the Unplugged Challenge Program. The program resulted in significant operational changes for the city that resulted in more sustainable operations

Media Appearances:

TV Appearances:

(2018) C-SPAN2/C-SPAN3

Interview on book, Creating Organic, to be featured on Springfield, MO weekend for C-SPAN network programming.

Radio Appearances:

(2018) Wisconsin Public Radio - Central Time Talk Show

Interview about renewal of the Farm Bill

(2015) KMSU Missouri State Journal

Interview on organic food policy and agriculture research.

Other:

(2017) Blog interview

Interview on legal and cultural interpretations of the term 'organic' in the United States.